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20110702
20110702
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the transition process. host: when that happens, how does the country in vision relations with pakistan, especially along the borders and with concerns about safe-haven? guest: safe havens, unfortunately, it is a fact that now everyone enologist. this is something we have been saying for the last 10 years or so. our president has still insisted on this. unless you are dealing with the safe haven, which is the root cause, no matter when you do in afghanistan. we will not get the objectives that we are both looking for. this is a problem, but the good news is we have had a constructive dialogue with pakistani government and also with other relevant authorities in pakistan to come up with a reconciliation program, something that we can both benefit from, to be an honest partner for the fight. host: for those discussions foster and all by the death of t osama bin laden? guest: even before that, we had started that discussion. now, after the death of bin laden, which was a great success for the afghan people and our partners, that created a unique environment for the reconciliation and every
tousaeu. >> acward moments and he said. helen thomas first question. >> you think that pakistan and our -- safe haven and afghanistan for these so-called terrorist. >> that was acward . thenn the guest book in westminister abbey can i give you my tory on that. >> it is a number of solutions for any given problem. >> i hate to get too da vinci code. may 24, 2008 trandsalates five, plus two is 7 . 7 plus four is 11 . two zeros keep it at 13 . eight makes it 21. he was telling us he got lucky with the queen. >> totally crazy. i don't want to consider that, miller. i don't think about that. >> back up theory. he signed 2008 and by the time it reads back to dc. >> he put me off with the queen line. >> coming up. undercover stings. are they ethical. jon stossel on that. and america's news quiz. embarrassed planned parent head and acorn. are those stings ethical and should we approve of them? here is jon stossel. >> it is creepy and i don't like to do it and sometimes we ought to because you can't get to the truth unless you go undercover. they don't behave normally with a camera. yes, i have
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
into pakistan is causing a huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks but a large number of anti-american-inspired suicide attacks. >> so besides the obvious policy of pulling out, is there another policy? >> absolutely. >> to prevent this. >> because pulling out, simply abandons our interests, ignores our interests. what this book suggests is a middle ground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions but does so with over the horizon, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states for decades in major regions of the world, such as the middle east with great success, and we should return to this policy. >> can you give us specifics about how we should pursue the policy in the middle east. >> in the 1970s and '80s, the united states had core interests in the middle east including the persian gulf and we maintained and secured those interests withou
. outpost caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, then every few days, this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic. they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are getting attacked from all sides. >> come on, hustle up. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming fortal ban talibae hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. but the bullets are too close. locals scatter. just before huge american fire power has the last word. four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban fall silent. america knew why it came here, but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get like a police call for like cigarette butts? >> absolutely. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop into strafe the hills. a show of force for the taliban are now either gone or dead, at least five killed by the soldiers count. the next morning, it
the country in vision relations with pakistan, especially along the borders and with concerns about safe-haven? guest: safe havens, unfortunately, it is a fact that now everyone enologist. this is something we have been saying for the last 10 years or so. our president has still insisted on this. unless you are dealing with the safe haven, which is the root cause, no matter when you do in afghanistan. we will not get the objectives that we are both looking for. this is a problem, but the good news is we have had a constructive dialogue with pakistani government and also with other relevant authorities in pakistan to come up with a reconciliation program, something that we can both benefit from, to be an honest partner for the fight. host: for those discussions foster and all by the death of t osama bin laden? guest: even before that, we had started that discussion. now, after the death of bin laden, which was a great success for the afghan people and our partners, that created a unique environment for the reconciliation and everyone should take it very seriously. we should be honest with
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)